Info

The Warrior Soul Podcast

Reclaim your Warrior Spirit. Each week, we'll be discussing tools, tactics, ideas, and strategies to help you strengthen your body, enhance your mind, and dominate life. US Marine Corps Veteran Chris Albert delivers a powerful message: life is too precious to sit idly and watch it go by. The Warrior Soul Podcast was created to help all Veterans, and anyone willing to listen, to live their best lives. Past guests include: Ryan Michler, Ben Greenfield, Remi Adeleke, Chris Bell, and so many more.
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
The Warrior Soul Podcast
2019
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: October, 2016
Oct 30, 2016

Andrew and I got together with our friend Tone Floreal in Redondo Beach, California this past weekend and we talked about why problems and struggle seem like a necessary obstacle in the pursuit of happiness.

This is a completely informal discussion. We basically went out to dinner and started a conversation about this subject and then I thought it might be a good idea to start recording because we started getting into some really in depth conversation that can relate to everyone who listens to this show.  

Oct 25, 2016

Dr. Anthony Beck is an author, speaker, and a leader in the medical world who is not afraid to tell it like it is. He has advised elite Special Operations Soldiers and has coached some of the world's most elite obstacle course racers. Unlike most medical doctors, Doctor Beck has a proactive approach to healthcare, and he wants to empower his patients to demand a higher standard of care from their health practitioners. 

Dr. Beck is a world class expert in designing wellness protocols for individuals based each persons' individual digestion, genetics, inflammatory response, and other idiosyncratic factors that could hold back performance. He has taken elite performers and made them better by empowering them the knowledge they need to break through their barriers. 

In this interview, Andrew and Chris ask Dr. Beck about his approach, the Balance Protocol, and it's applications for veterans and others to living their healthiest and fittest lives. We also discuss his advice for those of the younger generation who are still in active service.  

Oct 17, 2016

As a Special Forces Green Beret, Andrew Marr was used to performing at an elite level throughout his military career. 

Andrew's last deployment in 2013 was emotionally and physically taxing. He and his Special Forces team were engaged in constant combat throughout its entirety. As a breacher, Andrew suffered numerous traumatic brain injuries from explosions, which resulted in his medical retirement. 

When he returned to the states he began a 6-month spiral downward. Once an elite performer in life or death situations in combat, Andrew couldn't even remember how to drive home. He was plagued by psychological, physiological, and physical manifestations, including depression, outbursts of anger, anxiety, mood swings, memory loss, inability to concentrate, learning disabilities, sleep deprivation, loss of libido, loss of lean body mass, and muscular weakness.

Like Chris and so many other veterans, Andrew turned to alcoholism, developed a massive deep vein thrombosis (blood clot) that broke off into both lungs (bi-lateral pulmonary embolism), and a number of other medically documented conditions. Compounding this situation was that Andrew was also a husband and a father of five children. The medications and treatments that the VA was providing Andrew were not working and actually seemed to be making things worse. He could not be the man he needed to be for his family in this situation, so he decided to do something about it. 

He hit the books and began reading everything he could about brain function and traumatic brain injury. His research led him to Doctor Mark Gordon, who had developed a revolutionary treatment that included replenishing hormone production that was interrupted by inflammation induced by brain trauma. Andrew became Doctor Gordon's patient and experienced nearly immediate results. After years of pain and frustration, this man who could not even walk in a straight line in his worse periods of suffering, returned to his elite performance level. 

Andrew has since started the Warrior Angels Foundation with the mission of bringing this revolutionary treatment to all veterans who suffer from TBI. Literally one of the only charity founders who is trying to work himself out of a job, Andrew is working to turn this treatment into policy by getting the VA to make it into the standard of care for veterans suffering from TBI related brain conditions. 

By joining Warrior Soul, Andrew is also working to expand this mission by delivering knowledge in addition to treatment. Healing the brain and the body only solves part of the problem. His work with Warrior Soul is centered around getting men to develop the leadership, knowledge, and habits that will help them to live their best lives through health, wellness, abundance, and happiness. 

Oct 12, 2016
I am grateful to live in a place and a time where there are so many opportunities
I am grateful for having food and shelter.
I am grateful for the good people I have around me and for my girlfriend who supports me in everything I do.
I am grateful for my life and for the person I’ve become. 
 
I am grateful for not being rich. My at times desperate financial situation has only made me hungrier and more determined.
 
I am grateful that my last business failed. The experience taught me more about business and life than I would have ever learned in some classroom. 
 
I am grateful for my failed marriage. To truly appreciate a good relationship, in some ways, you have to experience a bad one. 
 
I am grateful that I was homeless. It’s allowed me to appreciate everything I have now and its given me the desire to help others who are in similar situations. 
 
I am grateful that I’m not a gifted athlete. It’s forced me to work harder, to understand the human body, and to help others achieve their goals. 
 
I am grateful for having had my heart broken more times than I can count. Each time, it’s brought me closer to where I’m supposed to be and set me free of comfort and dependence on others. 
 
I am grateful for having ulcerative colitis. It’s forced me to have respect for my body, to avoid pollutants, and its given me knowledge about the human body I would have never learned. 
 
I am grateful that I never knew my father. It’s forced me to find other mentors and to seek my own path to becoming a man. 
 
I am grateful for having loved ones and friends who’ve died. It’s taught me to truly appreciate the living and to never take any relationship with a loved one for granted. 
 
I am grateful for the long periods I spent alone without a relationship. These times allowed me the freedom to move to new places, to see the world, and to seek new adventures that made me the person I am today. 
 
I am grateful that I was bullied as a kid. This gave me empathy for those who might not be in a good place right now. 
 
1